8 Tips for Acing the Job Interview

8 Tips for Acing the Job Interview

Posted on 29. Oct, 2013 by in Featured, Interviews, Job Seekers

While the job interview can be scary, it doesn’t have to be hard to make a good impression. In fact, if you follow these 8 simple tips you will be able to make it through the interview without freaking out, impress the employer, and be able to move forward with your job search process:

1.Eye Contact: This is one of the most important things you can do in an interview. Making eye contact with your interviewer shows that you are confident in your expertise and interested in what your interviewer is saying. However, be careful that you are not staring your interviewer down. Be confident, not creepy.

2.Smile: This will also show confidence as well as put your interviewer at ease. A smile makes people feel like you are an enjoyable person and they will mirror the smile back. When you see your interviewer smiling, it will help you feel at ease and the cycle will continue throughout the interview.

3.Speak Clearly and With Purpose: If you need to, take a small moment and think about what you want to say (not too long or it will become awkward) in order to avoid using fillers such as “mm” “um” or “hmm.” This will make your answers precise, purposeful, and clear.

4.Be On Time: There is nothing that will put your interviewer off more than tardiness. Their time is valuable and if you are wasting it, even for a moment, you are giving the impression that you don’t care about them or their time. Be early if you can, but do not be late.

5.Be Honest: Lying is not appropriate or acceptable in the real world, so why would it be okay in a job interview? It isn’t. Be honest and it will make your life and your interview easier, as well as will prevent a termination down the road, if your lie is discovered.

6.Dress Professionally: It is an easy thing to overlook, but if you go into the interview looking dingy or unkempt, then you will put off an image that you don’t care about yourself or the interviewers. Dress like you care about yourself, the job, and the interviewer, and you will be on the right path to getting the job.

7.Don’t Interrupt: It seems simple enough, but it is important to remember. While you want to make sure that you express who you are and why you would be good for the job, you do not ever want to interrupt the interviewer. No matter how good you think your comment is, it is not good enough to interrupt your interviewer.

8.Be Friendly: Don’t be sarcastic or rude. Even if you are having a bad day or you just want to be done with the interview, make it seem like there is nowhere else you would rather be.

Follow these tips and you will be in good standing for your interview and you will be on your way to getting the job.

Erin Kennedy

Erin Kennedy, CPRW, CERW, BS/HR, is a Certified Professional Resume Writer/Career Consultant, and the President of Professional Resume Services. She is a nationally published writer and contributor of nine best-selling career books.

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2 Responses to “8 Tips for Acing the Job Interview”

  1. Juane Dunigan

    02. Nov, 2013

    Great! Do you have tips for negotiation?

  2. Erin Kennedy

    07. Nov, 2013

    Salary is tricky… if you are responding to an ad that has requested your salary history or salary requirements you could supply the info (certain companies or recruiters may not consider you if you don’t), or not supply it (some employers have admitted that they will consider you for an interview even if the info is not included)… sorry if this is confusing you.

    You could always add a line or two in your cover letter at the bottom before the last line that sounds something like this:
    “Most recently my salary has averaged $___ annually” (if your salary has varied over the years).

    Or: “My current salary objectives are in the $50,000 to $100,000 range”. This clearly defines the range without stating a specific figure.

    Or: “My salary requirements are negotiable and can be discussed at the time of the interview”… Not a great alternative, but you can use this type of response only when you do not want to provide any details.

    I’ve heard that the first person who mentions salary loses. A good response might be, “What is this position budgeted for?”

    Hope this helps. Let me know what happens!

    Erin

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